Die Grosse Fuge - © Agathe Poupeney

© Olivier-Culmann / Tendance-Floue

W.Forsythe / M.Ek / A.T. De Keersmaeker

Dance As a family

  • Maison de la Danse
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
    whose1 intermission (s)
  • +12years

COVID-secure Visit
A vaccine passport is required to attend this event.
Find out more

Three of dance’s biggest names have been invited to get the new season underway at the Maison de la Danse with this demonstration of the strong links between dance and sound. The aim: to make us listen to the dance and see the music.

  • 20:30
  • 20:00
  • 20:30
  • 20:30
  • 20:30

About

NNNN., Orchestra without instruments 
A genius jack-of-all-trades, William Forsythe likes nothing better than to experiment with neoclassical ballet, particularly if he can use new media as an integral part of his choreography. His mobile, flexible style of dance is based on the body’s own impulses and reactions. His NNNN quartet is a chamber orchestra without instruments, where the sound comes from the dancers. Soft landings, slaps, grumbles. During the piece, the dancers gradually become attuned to each other like a well oiled machine, though with some clown-like touches.

Solo for Two: The loneliness of being two 
Solo for Two is the stage version of a work originally created for the screen under the name Smoke. On a pristine powder-blue set, Mats Ek shows the life of a couple, the difficulties of being together and the desire for solitude. Set to three melancholic compositions by Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, we can see the Swedish choreographer’s signature style: flexed feet, “wavy” backs and deep pliés, turning convention on its head. A passionate and enthralling duo, subtly erotic, mischievous and knowing.
 
Die Grosse Fuge: Listen to the dance, see the music 
Here, Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker presents an intimate encounter with Beethoven's La Grande Fugue op.133 which became part of the Lyon Opera Ballet repertoire in 2006. About 15 minutes of sometimes graceful, sometimes rushed notes, for a creative, sought-after string quartet. The choreographer transposes the counterpoints into a series of gestural phrases echoed by six dancers and two female dancers in tuxedo pants and flowing shirts. A work deliberately devoid of aestheticism which celebrates the freedom of the body and assumes the masculinity of its vocabulary. A testament to the choreographer's mastery of the art of listening to the dance and seeing the music.
 

N.N.N.N.
Entrée au répertoire

Solo for Two
Reprise

Die Grosse Fuge
Reprise

In partnership with the Maison de la Danse

Family Days
Saturday September 18, 2021 at the Maison de la Danse

Come and explore backstage at the Maison de la Danse with our guests, the dancers of the Lyon Opera Ballet!
Recommended for 8 years old and above 
Full programme and registration details from August 23, 2021
Find out more

Voir aussi

  • Extraits du spectacle

    Extrait du spectacle

  • N.N.N.N.

    Répétition

  • Interview de Mats Ek

    Interview

  • N.N.N.N. - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • N.N.N.N. - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • N.N.N.N. - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • N.N.N.N. - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • N.N.N.N. - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • Solo for Two - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • Solo for Two - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • Solo for Two - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • Solo for Two - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • Die Grosse Fuge - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • Die Grosse Fuge - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

  • Die Grosse Fuge - © Agathe Poupeney

    Photos

Cast Solo for Two

Choreographer

Mats Ek

Music

Musique Arvo Pärt For Aline, Variationen Zur Gesundung Von Arinuschka, Mirror in Mirror

Lighting

Erik Berglund

Production Design and Costumes

Peter Freij

Cast Die Grosse Fuge

Choreographer

Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker

Music

Ludwig van Beethoven, Die Grosse Fuge, op.133, Quatuor Debussy (2006)

Production Design and Lighting

Jan Joris Lamers

Costumes

Rosas

Director

Jean-Luc Ducourt

Répétiteur

Clinton Stringer

Why we love it

The evening brings together three monuments of contemporary dance.

Why we love it

These three pieces celebrate the use of pared-back choreography to revisit neoclassical ballet.

Why we love it

This evening, starting off the new season, also marks the return of live shows.

My Evening